Where Are Any Online 2016 Conferences On How Does Cooperative Learning Improve Test Scores

Where Are Any Online 2016 Conferences On How Does Cooperative Learning Improve Test Scores

As far as I can tell, there’s a very, very large cottage industry which exists to provide webinars on the various methods of fostering higher education. The stuff that I think that it all revolves around is promoting what I think is mythic knowledge of how cooperative learning, as opposed to instruction driven learning, can improve students’ test scores, student-to-student interaction, etc. This seems to be based on a non-disputable fallacy, which is that a school—or institution of higher education—should somehow benefit from teaching groups or clusters of students, especially a group of students that could most readily understand concepts or speak a different language. I have not heard anyone point out, for example, that by more effectively engaging students in group meetings and projects, by choosing to create more learning experiences that encourage collaboration, anything they might achieve in test scores can be substituted for by simply doing the same amount of instruction or time allotment.

I would say that my general view, and that of a lot of people who I’ve spoken with over the years on this question, is that the very high level of empirical evidence that supposedly supports the use of various types of education strategies and platforms is nothing but hindsight’s definition of data, where at best very little substantive research exists to back up how these strategies have actually resulted in people leaving the (comparable) institution with higher test scores than those who lacked these curriculum/education support systems.

As far as I can tell, there’s a very, very large cottage industry which exists to provide webinars on the various methods of fostering higher education. The stuff that I think that it all revolves around is promoting what I think is mythic knowledge of how cooperative learning, as opposed to instruction driven learning, can improve students’ test scores, student-to-student interaction, etc. This seems to be based on a non-disputable fallacy, which is that a school—or institution of higher education—should somehow benefit from teaching groups or clusters of students, especially a group of students that could most readily understand concepts or speak a different language. I have not heard anyone point out, for example, that by more effectively engaging students in group meetings and projects, by choosing to create more learning experiences that encourage collaboration, anything they might achieve in test scores can be substituted for by simply doing the same amount of instruction or time allotment. I would say that my general view, and that of a lot of people who I’ve spoken with over the years on this question, is that the very high level of empirical evidence that supposedly supports the use of various types of education strategies and platforms is nothing but hindsight’s definition of data, where at best very little substantive research exists to back up how these strategies have actually resulted in people leaving the (comparable) institution with higher test scores than those who lacked these curriculum/education support systems.

I think that a number of these techniques or concepts have been around for years. What I find really disconcerting and frustrating is the lack of awareness by institutions and educators and companies who are selling education products that I believe have had one or more of these “proven” education techniques or programs. Does any of the companies out there that are selling these products not already know that this “wisdom” about how cooperative learning can improve test scores and improve student engagement, etc. And is not trying to promote how these collaborative efforts improve the university, and educational institutions, financially? Most definitely not.

There’s a lot of people out there who will sell you “crash courses” that are actually crash courses, that are designed to generate revenue while they are recorded and circulated among students. Why don’t they listen to what they are being paid to say— and not just what they are being paid to say— or… are they just paid to put together seminars/discussions that are not taken literally and in fact are often tantamount to promotional infomercials for other businesses and organizations?

There is probably plenty of evidence for these “proven” techniques, but it does feel like as far as higher education and classrooms and education in general is concerned, that there’s little or no evaluation by the institutions, or by individual educators, of the outcomes for these initiatives. Who decides how much or what kinds of training or workshops/andlentecos/etc. should be encouraged? How does this impact the amount of engagement and interaction with students and/or with teachers or with the general public and their own views on what a school or educational institution should or should not be and should be able to achieve? And…what happens once these courses have been “enhanced” by administrators and/or schools, and are used by, say, thirty additional teams of twenty or so teachers, and then

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