What Teenagers Are Learning From Online Porn New York Times

A new report from the New York Times turns a critical eye at teen sexual use online. In a third of the cases cited, teens (mostly boys) were diagnosed with either Internet addiction or sexually compulsive behaviors.

More and more students are coming to class (and the halls) hungry for information. Amid this wave of Googling, kids have learned to question authority and to question their parents, in their daily lives as well as in school. They’ve formed independent social groups whose members may disdain religion but are almost always bound by a love of video games and other forms of entertainment. They’ve constructed a desire to know, to learn, to be educated.

But as this information age has rolled on, nearly no one has been able to guarantee that students will have a wide and varied, enriching alternative to traditional education. We can’t just throw our hands up and shut down our curriculum, leaving it to a few savvy students to transform the lessons of evolutionary biology, calculus, and writing into immersive, entertaining, and informative Internet games. We need educational companies and scientists to step forward, to provide many kinds of material that today’s students will want to stick to. As these companies continue to turn their focus towards storytelling, games will now take the place of text or television. Teachers like me are looking for a variety of other ways to provide their students with information, enrichment, and entertainment.

There has already been discussion of a backlash to interactive public school curricula due to their high costs—now about $50 per day for the average pupil—and the notion that they deliver a higher quality of content than traditional content classes. There are certainly also fears that they will devalue standardized curriculum.

On the other hand, parents are convinced that games make things more interesting and fun. One of the ways in which this is verifiable is by the fact that most parents would much rather have their kids playing a highly engaging game than a textbook or homework assignment.

Digital technology has also allowed for hyperlabor specific to an educational game. For example, psychologists note that schoolgirls are more easily desensitized than boys. Thus, they are capable of playing mature video games with someone a number of years older than them. It is more difficult for younger children to handle adolescent material or mature video games. Thus, they are led astray by their teachers and older children more often than are their peers. Educators can help avoid this by categorizing the content as video games and de-emphasizing normal school-based textbooks.

We are also seeing a shift in how media companies are seeking to tap young audiences. The long-running PBS program Nova, which mostly attracts older audiences, will launch an African-American-studies-themed spinoff in January. Ad Age reports that Modern Woodmen of America, an insurance company that has an extensive digital presence, is seeking to break into the video game market.

On a broader level, we may have found a fresh avenue for re-imaging traditional education for digital use. Ever since the “I Have a Dream” speech became iconic, we have seen children singing with lyrics as we listen, at assemblies and in front of schools. It is only natural that these kinds of attempts should be integrated into an educational experience. One of the new, more popular and interactive video-game tutorials is “Intercept: The Math Block” published by Future Quest, a media company that also has a web portal for gameplay. It is played and studied in an engaging, fast-paced game, accessible for both preschool and middle school teachers.

But it is not just a way for teachers to get online to help out. For instance, across the globe children now must read and play other forms of educational software such as mobile apps. So, what is the experience going to be for students who are used to eating their lunch on screens?

But we, parents, can also keep an eye on what companies are doing to expand the extent of digital experiences. Some of the larger online gaming companies are integrating augmented and virtual reality. This also requires new kinds of content in addition to video games.

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