What Kids Are Learning From Online Porn New York Times

What Kids Are Learning From Online Porn New York Times

By Cathy Gillespie

Sitting in the waiting room of a local hospital, the doctor needed someone to do the company for him. He had a sick son who would be fine if he could simply feel his way through the exam.

“No one remembers names, or what you were wearing, or that your knees were hurting. But for my son,” he said, “there’s no other way to learn.”

It’s not that doctors are wrong about what they’re trying to do — learning diagnosis from an exam room is a necessary part of nursing. The problem lies with the technical tools they use.

By scanning a patient’s image through an array of computer programs, the physician, imaging technician and even a patient advocate can make a diagnosis by calculating the length of X-rays and the exact shape of the blood vessels in a particular patient’s face.

Gone are the days when doctors could look at old X-rays. They now spend more time searching for abnormal veins or bone structures. Many hospitals have an optional ultrasound program that can be installed on the patient’s bedside or done remotely on a video screen. That way, doctors can consult the expert in another room — which is where primary care doctors normally work — when a child exhibits unusual symptoms.

But that’s just the tip of the iceberg. These programs can also be used for more elaborate and questionable diagnoses. One prominent program — Facial Based Face Analysis — measures the subtle features of the face. Instead of measuring the volume of pores or the depth of the eye socket, however, the program takes more clinical steps to find a pattern in the way the face moves. After all, it’s easier to figure out which muscles someone uses to lift a bottle than if it were a person.

The facial recognition technology first gained popularity after it was used by police to identify passengers in an ATM. In fact, it’s been used by police and companies to perform facial recognition at sporting events and even in airports to identify illicit drug traffickers.

Still, Dr. William McWilliams, medical director of the Alexa and Facial Biometrics Center, told me that those uses aren’t appropriate for diagnoses.

“Using facial recognition to find a medical diagnosis is far too simplistic,” he said. “This is a first line of defense for special cases, but it’s not used by a routine family practitioner.”

Dr. John Crowley, a pediatric anesthesiologist at the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, agreed, saying the technology is particularly suited for urgent or emergent care only.

“They can look at certain high-risk patients in the emergency room, or if a child is exhibiting certain symptoms in the ER, but they really don’t have an understanding of a child’s psychological issues,” he said.

The two doctors agree, however, that doctors shouldn’t ignore these scans. They all said the technology can benefit children in their day-to-day and primary care practice. It’s simply a matter of finding the right tools to make the most of it.

“When I worked on the West Coast, I had a pediatrician who literally ran his practice on the computer,” Dr. McWilliams said. “The quality of care would increase dramatically if he had the information at his fingertips.”

“Certainly, a lot of us are using information that’s essentially proprietary, but we’re going to go for it anyway,” Dr. Crowley said. “There’s nothing really wrong with doing things that improve care for kids.”

There’s a short list of places where it might be appropriate, he says. He tells doctors to look into partnerships that allow for high-profile technology — it would bring in more money — and maybe even a service that would stream computerized information over the Internet, just like their now-common practice.

“Basically, what it boils down to is deciding what’s more important: patient safety or getting the information,” Dr. Crowley said. “Knowing you have an additional tool to help you find the most appropriate clinical question that needs to be asked.”

Click to rate this post
Total: 0 Average: 0
  1. Home
  2. Career
  3. What Kids Are Learning From Online Porn New York Times

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Fill out this field
Fill out this field
Please enter a valid email address.
You need to agree with the terms to proceed

A Mind For Numbers By Dr. Barbara Oakley,or Its Free Online Course,learning How To Learn
A Mind For Numbers By Dr. Barbara Oakley,or Its Free Online Course,learning How To Learn
How Online Learning Ted Talk
How Online Learning Ted Talk
Menu