New York Times What Teenagers Are Learning From Online Porn

New York Times explores how teen boys are using online porn to create better looking penises.

The New York Times weighed in on “Teens Are Having Sex, Which Comes With a Risk – That You Might Learn a Little Too Much” in a most fitting editorial:

The new generation of high school girls is acquiring sexual experience at a younger age than their predecessors. During high school years of just a few years, a third of American girls have had vaginal intercourse. Among boys, the percentage is only about one-fifth.

But to teenagers, erotica is a part of sex education, like gym, science and friends. The news is not all bad.

Research has shown that the internet has dramatically lowered the rate of teenage pregnancies. In addition, research has shown that e-sex has a positive impact on teens and young adults.

In a new study conducted at the University of Minnesota, virtual reality enables teenagers to experience real sexual outcomes. The Oculus Rift and LifeVibes apps, which work in conjunction with smartphone cameras and motion capture software, allow users to “experience sexual pleasure” in virtual reality and allow doctors and psychologists to evaluate the impact of fantasy on real life.

Professor Nilesh Jain of the University of Minnesota said, “Sex may be something you think about and visualize at home, but you don’t necessarily know if you are experiencing what someone else does. In virtual reality you can feel the sensation.”

He continued by adding, “This is the most immediate feedback you can get for real-life feedback.”

And, as our culture has moved away from abstinence, more and more consumers are turning to entertainment in order to absorb these real world standards.

One news article by Deborah Morales talked about this phenomenon in depth.

In the US, online porn has grown to become the “most widely accessed online content in history,” reaching an estimated 130 million people, according to the Internet Pornography Report: Worldwide Population and Pornography. The adult content market is expected to reach $30 billion by 2020 and is an accelerating platform for breaking taboos around the world. In most countries, more people are exposed to adult pornography online than during “real world” sex education. In every nation but one, people begin sex education earlier than they do on school premises (10 and 11), and most adults begin sex education at work, while teens watch porn-see everything.

And, it is this information that is important to the paper that was written in the wake of an alarming piece in the Philadelphia Inquirer which is finding that older women are engaging in unsafe sex. Here is a brief overview of the piece:

Recently Dr. Holly Grigg, an expert on adolescent sexual disorders at University of Cincinnati, made headlines with her remarks on our culture’s obsession with the sexualized female form. She said the porn depicted in movies, on billboards and in magazines “undermines women’s self-esteem and natural power.” “It used to be that sex in movie scenes was safe. You didn’t wear lingerie, you weren’t getting down to the whip and the chain and the cuffs,” she said. “I am deeply concerned about the effect [Porn) has on young people.”

While Dr. Grigg has no business speculating or trying to educate the media, this threaded article keeps going in the direction of fact. Those who just continue to lean on this male-biased mentality as an answer are doomed to fail, no matter how much TV (or cable) is carried and how much software is sold.

Porn doesn’t live with two men having sex. Porn lives with millions of Americans being exposed to erotica and/or pornography that can have very real consequences. All this addled masculinity and this tremendous disconnect between the self-esteem of a 17-year-old girl and the self-esteem of an adult man can keep you strapped on the seatbelt when really you shouldn’t be looking at the movie in question.

I have seen too many stories that have inspired me to want to tear my hair out. This is a tale of parenting, faith, education, freedom and pornography.

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