How Online Learning Impacts Kids

Internet education is rapidly evolving, and is becoming even more popular than it was just a few years ago. Online education delivers a broader spectrum of courses and learning experiences than traditional classrooms.

How Online Learning Impacts Kids

Have you ever seen a kid running down the sidewalk without a care in the world? That’s how some kids learn.

What’s happening in the brains of children who aren’t learning well is “not just biology but also behavior,” says Jen Faucher, MD, PhD, an associate professor of Pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine.

It’s about giving kids experiences and proper support that a brain scan wouldn’t reveal. And from the front line, that means active learning and exploratory play.

Teaching Kids Learn Properly

There are plenty of ways to help kids learn, but one of the simplest is talking. Show them what you learn. Maybe you read a chapter about math in a book and talk about that so they know the same thing’s happening.

You can also look at how your kids learn. If you look at an iPad for hours, you probably watch for letters and numbers and see what it does to your brain. If your kids learn well through conversations, they’ll know that your understanding of the world is a whole lot more rich than they will.

“Children are being motivated to achieve through play, exploration, learning, and imaginative play,” says Eliott Baiocchi, MD, PhD, chief of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Experimental Therapeutics Program, and the director of the Autism Spectrum Research Core. “Having active learning behaviors in childhood can help lower the risk of poor educational outcomes later in life.”

The benefits are clear. Thanks to active learning, kids lose more body fat than non-active kids, are more open to trying new things, and can focus better. In addition, I dare you to try as I did: You can learn Spanish, French, and Japanese faster through play and playfulness than you can in a textbook.

Watch While My Kid Learns

Even though this is hard, the secret is to get hands-on and make it a point to talk, learn, and play together.

OK, so you’re a snob. Are you going to go into a classroom and embarrass kids? No! But here’s how your home becomes a learning lab.

Take turns. The kids decide what to play with — reading, writing, math, science, reading out loud to each other, sitting in circle time — but don’t get in the way. Just listen to what they’re saying and do your best to ask questions if they need more clarification or help.

The kids decide what to play with — reading, writing, math, science, reading out loud to each other, sitting in circle time — but don’t get in the way. Just listen to what they’re saying and do your best to ask questions if they need more clarification or help. Chat It Up. Not only does this teach children to talk, but it also gets them outside their wheelhouse and, in the process, helps them find more answers.

Not only does this teach children to talk, but it also gets them outside their wheelhouse and, in the process, helps them find more answers. Watch video. Now’s the time to watch video together as often as possible. The brain adapts through education and continually relearns, and we spend more time thinking about new information than when we’re younger.

Now’s the time to watch video together as often as possible. The brain adapts through education and continually relearns, and we spend more time thinking about new information than when we’re younger. Make a commitment. Let your kids know that you’re with them during the time that they’re learning and are also there when they think something is going wrong, when they need to talk or go to a bathroom break.

Let your kids know that you’re with them during the time that they’re learning and are also there when they think something is going wrong, when they need to talk or go to a bathroom break. Get Your Own Brain Exercises. Write down exactly what they’re learning (and talk about it) when you can and write that down so you can refer to it later.

Write down exactly what they’re learning (and talk about it) when you can and write that down so you can refer to it later. Build a workbench. Figure out what your kids can do for you when they’re not doing their schoolwork and build up that routine — planning when they’re not supposed to be doing work, for example.

Figure out what your kids can do for you when they’re not doing their schoolwork and build up that routine — planning when they’re not supposed to be doing work, for example. Connecting Kids and Talk. Remind your kids that you’re always available for them when they need you and that you have patience.

I know, it’s hard to hold your tongue at a hot lunchtime. But if you do it long enough, you’ll learn to really listen, too.

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